Disrupted by unstable democracy protests and an unprecedented National Security Law, Hong Kong’s position as Asia’s favored financial hub is under threat like never before. Investing Columnist Leo Wang investigates the increasingly bleak future of “Asia’s World City” and the hopeful cities vying to replace her.Continue Reading

What if Nasdaq isn’t the dominant science and technology focused stock exchange? Investing Columnist Leo Wang explores the rise of Asia’s newest and most valuable market—one which also leads China’s counter against America’s technological and financial hegemony. Continue Reading

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many changes in the daily lives of people from all around the world. Video streaming on social media platforms has shown people rushing into grocery stores and stocking up on canned food and toilet paper. Colleges have abruptly transferred to online education via Zoom and other video conferencing tools. About 16 million Americans have lost their jobs since the start of lockdowns across the country. Small businesses and local stores still struggle to keep their businesses afloat.Continue Reading

A total of 101 incidents at various banks across Lebanon from November 1 to January 13, including sit-ins, minor and violent scuffles, hostage taking, and forklifts blocking bank entrances, have only contributed to the exponential decline in consumer confidence in local banks. To regain political balance and hopefully reinvigorate foreign stimulus to abate the rising economic disaster, a new Prime Minister, Professor Hassan Diab, was installed. However, this decision—one that was backed by the US-delegated terrorist militant group Hezbollah—has not sat well with citizens, as they believe the new candidate was selected by the same political elites behind past political corruption in Lebanon.Continue Reading

The antagonistic relationship between the two nations began back in 1910 when Japan colonized South Korea. Japanese oppression pushed Korean men into forced labor, required every Korean to rename themselves in Japanese, and punished Koreans for speaking Korean. During WWII, Japanese occupation grew worse when Japan objectified Korean women as their “comfort women”—a translation of the Japanese ianfu, euphemistic for “prostitute”—under the name of soldier motivation. Innocent teenagers were taken away from their homes and raped by Japanese soldiers. Continue Reading